Five Great Stocking Stuffers for the Art Lover

Start with concept boards if you really love art.

Great stocking stuffers for the art lover.

  1. Coloring Book
  2. Art Prints
  3. Post Cards
  4. Books on Art and Artists
  5. Gift Certificate

Stocking stuffers don’t have to be cheap. The best stocking stuffers are the ones that show you know and appreciate the person whose stocking you’re filling.

Whether it’s a gift for your mom, dad, spouse, sister or friend, these stocking stuffer ideas are sure to be appreciated by the art lovers in your life:

ArtGift Card: Let them choose their next piece of art with an Artgift card. Available in denominations from $10–$500 and redeemable for any artwork on Art.com, it’s the perfect way to give art this holiday season.

Gel Pen Set: Gel pens are great for all types of projects from writing and journaling to sketching and more. This set comes with a range of colors including metallics, pastels, fluorescents and glitter varieties so they can add some sparkle to their next project.

“Painting With Bob Ross” Book: Celebrate everyone’s favorite TV artist with this collection of his most popular paintings and techniques — all with that signature Bob Ross flair!

Adult Coloring Book: Coloring isn’t just for kids anymore! Adult coloring books are all the rage right now and there’s no better way to relax than spending some time coloring intricate.

Treat the art lover in your life to a stocking stuffer they’ll appreciate this Christmas.

Art lovers can be hard to please when it comes to shopping for gifts. They have their own unique tastes and, even if there is something they want, chances are, they’ve already bought it for themselves.

But these stocking stuffers for the art lover are sure to satisfy any recipient. Make their holiday season better with one of these unique gifts — and make sure you get a gift receipt in case you need to return it.

Let’s face it, shopping for someone who loves art can be hard.

Everyone has their special subjects and styles they love, so it can be tough to find a one-size-fits-all gift. And while books may be the obvious choice, they’re not always the most exciting gift option.

We’ve selected five great presents, each under $20, that will delight any art lover in your life. These gifts are perfect for filling stockings or grabbing on the fly at the last minute when you realize you forgot to buy something for your favorite art historian or studio artist. Being an art lovers is not enough you still need a tips from others.

You can never go wrong with a fresh sketchbook. This sturdy spiral-bound pad from Strathmore is made of heavyweight paper that works well with pen, pencil and watercolor washes. The paper is also acid-free, so it won’t deteriorate over time. At 8 by 10 inches, this sketchbook is large enough to keep at home or easily fit into a bag for on-the-go artwork.

The Art and Craft of Motion Picture Filmmaking

If you want to become a successful filmmaker, you should know the art and craft of filmmaking and consider also the use of tv storyboard. When most people think of film, they think of the final product, the feature or documentary that is shown in theaters or on television. However, there is a long process between concept and execution. I prepared this article for anyone who wants to learn more about the art and craft of filmmaking. As you read through the information, remember that much of it applies across media platforms.

There are two kinds of filmmakers: those who spend hours, months or years trying to get the right shot, and those who are willing to sacrifice quality for speed. The former group always ends up with a masterpiece. The latter group almost always ends up with something that can be re-cut in post-production.

Whether you’re a film student, professional, or enthusiast, it’s important to understand the basics of the craft. It doesn’t take away from your ability to have a unique style and invent new ways to film things – but it does mean that you’ll know when you’re doing something wrong.

It’s a noble ambition—to tell stories that are new and original, to present human experiences in vivid and unforgettable ways. And it’s an equally ambitious task—the creation of a motion picture.

The movie industry is international in scope, an art form in which creative minds from every continent come together to tell stories through the universal language of film: images, sound and music. There are no barriers here; the elements of filmmaking are understood around the world.

Aspiring filmmakers may begin their careers in many different ways: as directors of photography, editors, production designers or composers… or as screenwriters. But all must work together to create a fluid and seamless whole. There can be no true understanding of a story without an appreciation of cinematography, editing and music—and none of these can succeed without a brilliant screenplay at their core.

The art and craft of filmmaking are heavily dependent on each other. You cannot have one without the other, because technique is a part of art. In this blog post I will be focusing on the art of filmmaking and how it can be separated into three categories, which are the essentials of a story, writing, directing and acting.Film is a visual medium and is mostly about telling a story through pictures. Before production starts, stories are written and then sold to investors who provide money in order for the film to be produced. On set, everything is planned out methodically and with great detail by the director and crewmembers including the actors who not only interpret the characters but bring them to life as well..

During production editing begins where editors work with the director to shape the film into its final form. When all is said and done post-production begins where composers create the score, sound effects technicians add any additional sounds to the film like foley, colorists grade the picture, editors complete their cuts and add in any visual effects that have been designed by visual effects supervisors. Actors then come back to do ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement), which is when they re-record any lines that may have been missed during filming. Learn how to do storyboarding as part of your film production.

How I Made $1,000,000 with One Painting

I have an original painting that I bought for $200 in the late 1980s. The painting is by David Hockney, one of the most influential pop artists. Hockney's works are worth millions of dollars today.
Hockney made a series of paintings in Los Angeles in 1988. He called the series the "joiner" paintings, because they were all painted on canvases he'd joined together. The canvas I own is one of three known to still exist.
I decided to sell my painting because I needed cash for my startup business. So I put it up for auction on eBay, with a starting price of $17,000. The auction ended on October 31st, 1999; the final bid was $1,037,500 (including shipping). The winning bidder was an anonymous collector who paid by overnight check (I don't do credit cards). Now I'm happily running my business and I don't need to sell any more original art, though it's tempting to think about what else might turn up. The original art in the pat decades are far from today, most of the art today are use as concept boards for films.
One afternoon in 2002, I got a call from an old friend, Alex Daoud. Alex was living in New York now, and he said, "I want to send you something. Can you fax it?"
"Sure," I said. "What is it?"
"A painting."
"What kind of painting?"
"It's a Pollock."
And then there was a click. The line went dead.
Alex had worked for me selling paintings when I was running the contemporary art department at Sotheby's in the 1980s. During that time he'd had some success as an art dealer on his own. And if the painting he said was a Pollock really was one, it might be worth $10 million or more. Even if it wasn't by Pollock, it could still be worth more than many entire collections of contemporary art. But if I didn't act quickly enough, someone else would buy it before I even knew about it. Now I had to figure out how to get the painting into my hands without missing my chance to be the winner of this game of hot potato that Alex was playing with his unwanted masterpiece.
"You'll never make money with that."
That's what my former professor said when I told him I was going to try to sell a painting.

Here's the story of how I made $1,000,000 with one painting.
I was a painter in graduate school. My professors were encouraging and told me I had real talent. But they also said I should look for something "more practical," since making a living as a painter is so difficult.
My plan was to get a job in a gallery and learn from them how to sell paintings. I didn't know that galleries generally don't sell paintings. They just collect commission on sales that happen somewhere else.
I took a job in a gallery and tried to learn from them, but it quickly became apparent that galleries don't actually do anything to help artists get their work noticed.

Mostly they hang up paintings and invite people who want to buy art to come look at them. If someone wants to buy something, they take the buyer back into an office and get commission from the sale, but they don't tell buyers what artist's work is good or bad, or whether the work is overpriced or underpriced, or whether it would look better framed a different way or hung a different.
You can't make money selling art. That's what I used to tell my students when they asked me how to make a living as an artist. I was wrong.
I am no longer an art teacher, but I still love thinking about art. When you're an artist, your job is to look at things differently than other people do. And that makes you good at other jobs too, like writing or marketing or strategy or even painting if you ever get around to it.
The one-million-dollar painting is not famous, so let me describe it. It's by an unknown artist named John Peto (1854-1907). It is called The Doctor, and it hangs in the Peto family home, which is now a museum in Easton, Connecticut.

As far as I know no one has ever written about this picture before. Yet it is one of the most interesting works of art I know of.
It is interesting for what it is and for what happens in front of it every day: people come up with stories about what's going on in the picture and why it was painted just that way. Each viewer has his own story; there are no right answers.