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Are you Wasting your Time?

Picture the scene, you are in the supermarket, at the gym, at a social event. You are introduced to a person or they approach you with the opening line, ” I hear you teach Pilates, what’s it all about? Nutritionist Northern Beaches ensures that you will energize because eating consciously is like meditating.

It is easy to launch into a whole story about the history of Joseph Pilates, his internment, his flight from Germany to the US, meeting Clara his wife blahblahblah….

AUTOMATIC PILOT

Someone has pushed your button, if you are not careful you will either bore them rigid because they were only being polite, making small talk or you will completely waste your time.

So think about this. When we decide to do something, change our behavior in some way:

Stop smoking

Take up exercise

Start smoking (just kidding)!

We go through Six Stages of Change, this process was identified by James Prochaska and Carlo DiClemente in the late 1970s and early 80s at the University of Rhode Island, when they were studying how smokers give up their addiction.

SIX STAGES OF CHANGE

-Pre-contemplation. Ignorance is bliss, the person has no desire to change behavior.

-Contemplation. Acknowledgment of the need for change but not ready.

-Preparation. Getting ready

-Action. Changing behavior

-Maintenance. Maintaining behavior changes

-Relapse. Returns to old behavior, abandons the changes

Let’s get back to the party. You have just met someone who throws out the comment “what’s this Pilates all about?” Depending which STAGE OF CHANGE they are at will determine your response.

How can you tell?

A few simple questions will quickly let you know how far long the process they are, or if they are just filling in time waiting for more interesting company. Your first response to the “what’s it all about” should be short and sweet. Practice a concise reply, e.g. “its a body conditioning system that will improve posture, tone and shape”. Sometimes that is the end of the conversation about Pilates and they change the subject. Pre-contemplation.

If they continue with questions, ask them for their contact details so you can send information to them. This causes a couple reactions:

They tell you they are looking at various options Contemplation

They are happy to give you details. Preparation

Avoid getting into detailed explanations in a nonprofessional atmosphere. They won’t remember anyway. If they are happy to give you contact details, suggest you make an appointment for a consultation. They may not be ready to commit to an appointment.

Preparation

Make sure you send the information as promised. Always carry your business card and or schedule so you can quickly hand it to them even if they don’t want to go further than a basic inquiry. This way they may contact you when they are ready.

Always follow up. Whether you post out hard copy information or send it by e mail when you think they should have received the information contact them to confirm receipt. Avoid trying to move them forward in the process at this point. Your contact is purely to confirm they have received the information and to answer any questions.

Finish this conversation/email by asking their permission to contact them again. This will stop the feeling of the cold call and give them the opportunity to stop you contacting them. They will feel in control.

The second follow up should come 3-5 days later. This time the enquiry is about any further questions and some kind of incentive to make an appointment either to attend a class or consultation for a personal training session.

The third and final follow up at this stage, assuming they have not made any commitment to classes or personal training is to acknowledge they are obviously very busy, that you will not contact them again other than to update them on new events, classes and offers. This will sometimes move them towards the Action stage. If it doesn’t then you can keep them on the database with their permission to keep in touch.

Of course you want the process to be smooth so they move into the Action and Maintenance stages. During this time we are developing a stronger relationship with them, it is in our ongoing business interest to keep this relationship alive, creative and happy.

It is a natural cycle of life that the Relapse stage will come along at some point. Maybe they just break routine by going on holiday, family of work commitments change and the process starts all again.

This time however the initial stages will move along more quickly as it is a familiar place for them and the decision making process will be easier. Of course we want them to return to us so the relationship we have built must be maintained, even if they are in their Relapse phase, keep in touch, so that when the Action stage comes around again they know where to go and that they will be welcomed back with a smile.

These Six Stages of Change relate to any behavior changes and the sooner you get to grips with recognising the various ways to interpret your potential new clients reaction and connect to one of the six stages, the sooner you will be able to join the conversation.

Nuala Coombs – thepilatesconsultant.com

About Nuala Coombs. With over 25 years experience in the fitness and Pilates industry Nuala has taught hundreds of students worldwide to teach Pilates. She is the author of Golf and Pilates published in 2005 as well as an international presenter and teacher trainer. Based in the south of France along with teacher training and workshops she offers career guidance to teachers in training and qualified Pilates teachers at a crossroads in their working life. Nuala also offer Pilates Retreats for Pilates enthusiasts. Contact her to sign up for her free monthly Newsletter at http://www.thepilatesconsultant.com.

Email: [email protected]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Nuala_Coombs/177262

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How I Made $1,000,000 with One Painting

I have an original painting that I bought for $200 in the late 1980s. The painting is by David Hockney, one of the most influential pop artists. Hockney's works are worth millions of dollars today.
Hockney made a series of paintings in Los Angeles in 1988. He called the series the "joiner" paintings, because they were all painted on canvases he'd joined together. The canvas I own is one of three known to still exist.
I decided to sell my painting because I needed cash for my startup business. So I put it up for auction on eBay, with a starting price of $17,000. The auction ended on October 31st, 1999; the final bid was $1,037,500 (including shipping). The winning bidder was an anonymous collector who paid by overnight check (I don't do credit cards). Now I'm happily running my business and I don't need to sell any more original art, though it's tempting to think about what else might turn up. The original art in the pat decades are far from today, most of the art today are use as concept boards for films.
One afternoon in 2002, I got a call from an old friend, Alex Daoud. Alex was living in New York now, and he said, "I want to send you something. Can you fax it?"
"Sure," I said. "What is it?"
"A painting."
"What kind of painting?"
"It's a Pollock."
And then there was a click. The line went dead.
Alex had worked for me selling paintings when I was running the contemporary art department at Sotheby's in the 1980s. During that time he'd had some success as an art dealer on his own. And if the painting he said was a Pollock really was one, it might be worth $10 million or more. Even if it wasn't by Pollock, it could still be worth more than many entire collections of contemporary art. But if I didn't act quickly enough, someone else would buy it before I even knew about it. Now I had to figure out how to get the painting into my hands without missing my chance to be the winner of this game of hot potato that Alex was playing with his unwanted masterpiece.
"You'll never make money with that."
That's what my former professor said when I told him I was going to try to sell a painting.

Here's the story of how I made $1,000,000 with one painting.
I was a painter in graduate school. My professors were encouraging and told me I had real talent. But they also said I should look for something "more practical," since making a living as a painter is so difficult.
My plan was to get a job in a gallery and learn from them how to sell paintings. I didn't know that galleries generally don't sell paintings. They just collect commission on sales that happen somewhere else.
I took a job in a gallery and tried to learn from them, but it quickly became apparent that galleries don't actually do anything to help artists get their work noticed.

Mostly they hang up paintings and invite people who want to buy art to come look at them. If someone wants to buy something, they take the buyer back into an office and get commission from the sale, but they don't tell buyers what artist's work is good or bad, or whether the work is overpriced or underpriced, or whether it would look better framed a different way or hung a different.
You can't make money selling art. That's what I used to tell my students when they asked me how to make a living as an artist. I was wrong.
I am no longer an art teacher, but I still love thinking about art. When you're an artist, your job is to look at things differently than other people do. And that makes you good at other jobs too, like writing or marketing or strategy or even painting if you ever get around to it.
The one-million-dollar painting is not famous, so let me describe it. It's by an unknown artist named John Peto (1854-1907). It is called The Doctor, and it hangs in the Peto family home, which is now a museum in Easton, Connecticut.

As far as I know no one has ever written about this picture before. Yet it is one of the most interesting works of art I know of.
It is interesting for what it is and for what happens in front of it every day: people come up with stories about what's going on in the picture and why it was painted just that way. Each viewer has his own story; there are no right answers.

Are You Struggling With How To Figure Out What To Paint?

I feel there is an idea, an image, a scene, something I want to paint. But I can’t seem to figure it out… I make sketches…but they don’t quite get it.
When the time comes to put paint on the canvas, I get confused. I feel that I am not able to do what I really want to do. And then I get blocked and frustrated….and quit. Tv storyboard artists effort is really extra ordinary in order for them to produce the best results.

I have this feeling that there is something in my brain that must come out on my canvas…but how do I discover what it is?

This is a frustrating situation for me as well as for my students and workshop attendees. It is difficult for them and their teachers when the painting process becomes a struggle with knowing how to start a painting.

What if I told you that there was a way you could bypass all the trouble of figuring out what you wanted to paint? What if you could bypass all those sketches, those paintings that do not express what you really want to say? That would give you more time to paint and less frustration trying to figure out “what” to paint!

I believe you can learn how to see your way into a painting right from the start so that you have more time for the fun part – actually painting!

If you were to ask a professional artist what the most important thing is in painting, they would probably tell you that it was practice. All other factors, such as talent and skill, are secondary. They might say this because they believe it, but also because it’s true.

So how much practice should you do? The answer to this question depends on your goals. If your goal is to become a professional artist, then a lot of practice would be a good idea, if you can manage it. But if your goal is simply to paint for fun, then less practice might be better.

Are you struggling with how to figure out what to paint? Or, are you thinking that it would be easier if you could know ahead of time what the resulting painting will look like? The following is for you.

There are no special tricks or things to do to guarantee your painting will turn out as you want; the only way it will turn out right is to make it right. This can be frustrating if you are not sure what is “right.” It can seem that there are so many decisions to be made that it would be easier if you could just know ahead of time what the painting will look like. That way, you could just go down a list of instructions.

The answer is that the paintings do have an appearance in mind before I start them. They have a specific kind of look or feel or mood or story or whatever, and I need to achieve that look, feel, etc. but it isn’t something I can specify ahead of time. I have to figure it out as I go along because this is one of the ways paintings are unique each time they are made.

How to a Create a Good Storyboard

Tv storyboard translate mood and emotions into visual communication adding the magic touch of lighting. Storyboards show you the basic strokes of what will become your design. They’re powerful tools, and when used properly can help make your designer-client relationship one worth building. If you want your next design to be better than the last one, you need to put into it a good storyboard. In this article I’ll break down what a storyboard is and why using them is important. When you’re done reading, download our free checklist to help build your own effective storyboard for your next design project!

Have you ever thought, “How do I create a great storyboard?” Storyboards are very important to storyboarding. A well-thought out storyboard will help you immensely with creating your animation. A well-drawn storyboard will even help you sell your ideas for Animation companies when pitching them the idea of working together. I will show you how to create a basic storyboard using popular software available for free in order to get your started.

When you’re jumping balling with ideas for your next product, storyboarding can be the difference between creating something exciting and something that doesn’t feel as though it’s going to come out right. Storyboards can help demonstrate the direction you’re going in, how various pieces fit together, how big your ideas are, and even which screens/behaviors are most important to include (or omit). A good start for creating a storyboard isn’t plentiful; you’ll need to figure out a few things for yourself. But the important thing is that you figure it out before you start building.

Visual stories are powerful — they can propel you forward in your ideas, convince you to take action and persuade. Stories can even change your mind. A good storyboard starts with an idea, then creates a direction for the story, follows that with action items and describes any complications or obstacles that may block progress. Storyboarding is a powerful technique that allows you to give your imagination a thorough workout.

A storyboard is a graphical representation of what you want your design to look like before you start building it. It helps you communicate your idea in a concise way. You should have at least one complete page of storyboards ready before designing any part of your design. When designing new elements, you should add them to the page as needed and update the storyboard as needed as you think of additional changes. It can help your team members understand how things will look when developed, as well as helping you see design solutions more clearly. Come to visit online for storyboard template that you can use it as a baseline.